DeltaMaker Team 3D Prints “Makey” Robots

The team over at DeltaMaker has been helping out the Maker Faire Orlando team by printing “Makey” the Maker Faire robot (he’s in our logo!) – and they share a great timelapse video of their “botfarm” in action. Make sure to stop by the DeltaMaker exhibit to thank them for sponsoring Maker Faire Orlando!

Orlando Sentinel Arts & Entertainment Season Preview

The Orlando Sentinel just released their Arts & Entertainment Season Preview – and they featured Maker Faire Orlando! Check out the video below, the section on Maker Faire starts at 4 minutes into the video. For more media coverage of Maker Faire Orlando, check out our Media page.

Meet the Maker(s): Tampa Hackerspace

Tampa-Hackerspace-2048-Transparent

Maker Faire Orlando is a maker magnet, drawing creative and energetic individuals and groups from all over the state.  Tampa Hackerspace is one those groups,  opening as Tampa’s first Hackerspace in 2013, and recently moving into bigger quarters to accommodate a growing and active membership.

We asked Director of Operations, Jon Adair, a mobile app developer with his own company, Thinkamingo, and a founding member of Tampa Hackerspace, to tell us more about  the space and what they’re bringing to Maker Faire Orlando.

Tell us about Tampa Hackerspace.

THS 2JA: Tampa Hackerspace is a non-profit, member-driven workshop. We provide space, equipment, and a community for people to make stuff. We now have three 3D printers, 2 CNC machines, an electronics lab, a wood / metal shop, and classroom space. We offer over a dozen classes for members and nonmembers on everything from Arduinos to Lockpicking to 2D Art. Every Tuesday we hold an Open Make Night for people to come check out the space, meet people, get advice or help on a project, 3D print something, etc.

Continue reading

Meet the Maker: Nepchune’s Noise Circus

Chuck Stephens performing at Gulf Coast MakerCon 2014 in Tampa.

Chuck Stephens performing at Gulf Coast MakerCon 2014 in Tampa.

Chuck Stephens is an artist, musician, hardware hacker and small boat builder who specializes in the use of recycled, repurposed and salvaged materials.   He’ll be exhibiting at Maker Faire Orlando as Nepchune’s Noise Circus.  We asked him to tell us a bit more about what he does and why he does it.

What’s a “Noise Circus”?

The Noise Circus is the result of my experimentation with electronic noise circuits and generative music. My goal is to build machines that use sensors or internal logic to create evolving rhythmic and melodic patterns. I use simple circuits like building blocks to build more complex devices capable of a wide variety of musical possibilities.

This year I’ll have my Lunetta open patch CMOS based sound machine. This device uses very simple logic circuits to create complex rhythmic and melodic patterns by manually rewiring circuits with alligator clip lead wires. Once it’s wired up it can create amazingly complex and evolving sounds- from repeating musical patterns and beats to atmospheric sounds and horror/scifi sound effects. I’ll also have my Medusatron optical sequencer, circuit bent toys, an Arduino based synth and some other fun projects. I’ll have things hooked up so folks can play around and I’ll turn it up and do a few jams throughout the day.

Continue reading

Meet the Maker: Brian Johnson of Johnson Arms Replicas and Props

brianjohnson

For over five years, Brian Johnson of Johnson Arms Replicas and Props has been customizing guns, blades, helmets, and other props for collectors and cosplayers. From original steampunk designs to video game, TV, and movie replicas, Brian does it all. Here, he lets us in on his favorite part of the process, what got him started, and more!

How did you get started making custom props?

It all started with doing a repaint on one of my son’s Nerf blasters about 6 years ago. He agreed to let me offer it on eBay and it sold for what I thought was a reasonable amount. So we went to the store and bought a few more… which has lead to more custom blasters than I can remember, haha.

When replicating a prop, how do you figure out what elements or techniques to use? Do you go for exact duplication or put your own spin on things?

Since I do almost everything on commission, I usually let the buyer decide the method. I really enjoy emulation without trying to be exact. That’s where the Nerf and other toy shooters are great. I can do a lot with a cool design and some paint.

If exactness is required, that’s when we can bring in 3D scanning or modeling to make something as close as possible. It’s quite a bit more expensive, but there are a lot of people who will pay for that uniqueness.

Continue reading